Posts Tagged 'Motion Control'

Motion Control Technology Handbook

Published by Manufacturing Automation

Manufacturing AUTOMATION’s ‘Motion Control Technology Handbook’ is a digital magazine that focuses on Automation and Motion Control products and systems.  Posted on MA’s website as an interactive flip-style magazine, the Technology Handbook provides market information, technical product information, tutorial video’s, white papers as well as trends within the Motion Control Industry.

Motion Control Technology Handbook

 

This is a must-read for all to OEM machine builders, end users and system integrators.  Click on the link below to view the Handbook.

http://mfgautomation.techhandbook.dgtlpub.com/2013/2013-11-30/home.php

Tags:  Motion Control, Motor Control, Machine Control, Servo Systems, Stepper Systems

Live Webinar: Designing an Optimal Rotary Motion Joint for Robotics & Factory Automation

 

Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now.

Register now to watch this webinar live or anytime after July 29, 2014.

Harmonic Drive® gearing is a dominant technology used in precision rotary motion applications in the field of robotics and factory automation as well as other industries such as machine tool, semiconductor, and medical equipment.   Basic principles and technical considerations will be reviewed leading to a discussion of rotary actuator joint design optimized for the application requirements while minimizing size & weight.

Webinar Content to Include:
-Overview of Harmonic Drive gearing principles and operation
-Technical considerations of joint performance
-Application design examples
-Design enhancements and customization

Title: Designing an Optimal Rotary Motion Joint for Robotics and Factory Automation
Date: Tuesday, July 29, 2014
Time: 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM EDT
Presenter: Bob Mullins, VP of Sales, Harmonic Drive LLC

 

Tags:  Harmonic Drive, Electromate, Strain Wave Gearing, Rotary Motion, Automation, Motion Control, Webinar, HD, Robotics, Factory Automation

 

 

Highly Dynamic DC Brushless Servo Motor – maxon’s EC-i40

Compact And Powerful

In automation and robotics, many applications are characterized by high energy and high torque at the same time.  Spatial restrictions also mean that drives must be short, have a long service life and be maintenance-free.  The newly redesigned EC-i motors from maxon motors offer solutions that fit these requirements perfectly.

Maxon EC-i40 Brushless Servo Motor

Maxon EC-i40 Brushless Servo Motor

These brushless DC motors have several key advantages: low inertia, minimal detent, robust bearings and compact construction.  The use of high-powered permanent magnets ensures high power density, providing great speed stability under load.

These motors are available in 40 mm diameter and in two lengths, namely 26 mm (50 Watt) and 36 mm (70 Watt).  The modular system with gearheads, encoders and controllers from the maxon delivery program offers a large number of possible combinations.

EC-i motors are ideally suited for applications that require maximum drive in a minimum space.  Typical areas of application are robotics, industrial automation and security technology. 

Click on the link below for more information.

http://www.electromate.com/products/?keyword=EC-i+40&d=102310

EDITORIAL CONTACT:
Warren Osak
sales@electromate.com
Toll Free Phone:   877-737-8698
Toll Free Fax:       877-737-8699
www.electromate.com

Tags:  maxon, maxon motor, maxon DC motor, Electromate, EC-i40, servo motor, BLDC motor, brushless motor, flat motor, pancake motor, automation, electric motor, motion control

 

 

Motion Control for Newbies

Motion Control For Newbies
Check out the latest publication from the maxon academy, Motion Control for Newbies, a practical introduction to motion control.  132 pages.

The basic approach of this textbook, like many, is a practical and experimental one; however, it is reversed from most.  Instead of first explaining the theory of motion control and then applying it to specific examples, here we will start with hands-on experimenting on a real maxon EPOS2 P positioning control system by means of the EPOS Studio software and explain all the relevant motion control principles/features as they appear on the journey.  Therefore, the text contains mainly the exercises and practical work to do.  Background information can be found in the colored boxes.

This is primarily a textbook about motion control and not about programming a PLC. Therefore, the programming part should be considered as an introduction on how to program the motion control aspects.  It is not a full PLC programming course.

Motion control is mechatronics.  It is the combination of mechanics and electronics, of actuators (motors) and sensors all controlled by software.  In this textbook, we identify and define the role, behavior and mutual interaction of the different elements of a motion control system.  However, we need to know the basic internal construction and working principles of the elements only to a limited extent, but rather look at them as a black box.  Given a certain input, what comes out of the box?  How is this output generated and which parameter can be used to influence the output?  For instance, we will not explain how feed forward control must be implemented, but we will explain the basic idea of it and how the parameters will look during axis tuning… click on the link below to download the complete textbook.

http://www.maxonmotorusa.com/medias/sys_master/8812127617054/Motion-Control-for-Newbies.pdf

More information on the minimotors from Maxon Motor AG can be viewed at-

http://www.electromate.com/products/?partner=1072297493

For more information, please contact:

EDITORIAL CONTACT:

Warren Osak
sales@electromate.com
Toll Free Phone:   877-737-8698
Toll Free Fax:       877-737-8699
www.electromate.com

 

Tags:  Maxon, maxon motor, Electromate, Mini Motor, Servo Motor, BLDC Motor, Brushless Motor, EPOS2, Motion Control, Automation, Motor Control, Textbook, motors

 

New Generation of Hexapedal Robots

Whether traversing over the sands of Mars, or walking up a stone path, this robot was designed to move easily and quickly, to jump, and even to flip over.

The biologically inspired robots being designed at the University of Pennsylvania aim to provide new levels of mobility and durability, while providing the capability for rapid behavior development.  The X-RHex (Robot Hexapod) is the latest version of the highly mobile RHex platform.  X-RHex was designed for greater strength, longer runtime, and more mobility than previous versions, plus it is the first RHex to be built to carry a modular payload architecture to support a wide variety of research requirements.

The six legged robot is modeled after insects where three legs are always touching the ground at the same time. As a running robot, the X-RHex provides robust operation in complex, natural, outdoor terrain. The robot is expected to be an effective research machine for in the laboratory as well as outdoors for field tests.

The payload specifications include a 5V, 12V, and battery voltage (37V to 42V) power interface, and a USB and Ethernet connection.  Payloads are attached to the robot using mil-spec Picatinny rail mounted standard interface.  While typical payloads are often smaller in mass than the X-RHex itself, the robot has been tested for carrying up to 12kg on its back, which is significantly heavier than the weight of the robot. Payloads can include webcams, GPS units, and a secondary computer for fast processing of sensor data.

The X-RHex body is 57 x 39 x 7.5 cm, with a ground clearance of 12.5 cm (12 cm when inverted).  Each leg has a diameter of 17.5 cm, and the unit weights 9.5 kg with both batteries installed.  One of the main objectives for the mechanical design of X-RHex was to improve its frame durability in both resistance to fatigue and impact, as well as serviceability while achieving better performance than past models of RHex.

Leg design, on the other hand, was preserved.  The leg mounts are nearly centered on the thinner body, which means the robot operates with greater ground clearance even when in an inverted state.  The motors were chosen after careful analysis of the performance of past RHex robots.  The team chose to use flat brushless motors designed and manufactured by maxon motor USA. Each motor offers 84 Watts of continuous power, has a gear ratio of 28:1, and a maximum robot power density of 240 W/kg.

UPenn robot_2The X-RHex is designed around four subsystems, including a main computer, electronics stacks, batteries, and motor assemblies.  While the main computer handles all high-level control and communications; the electronics stacks house the motor controller, control interface board, and the battery management board used for power distribution, regulation, protection, and monitoring.  Mounted to the outer side of each stack is a lithium polymer batter and interface board.  A motor assembly, which contains the brushless motor and related sensors, is located at each of the six hips.

X-Rhex travels at a high speed of about four body lengths per second (about two meters per second).  The motors used are maxon EC 45 brushless motors.  There is one located at each of the six C-legs (the leg is shaped like a C).  The C-legs are basically springs, which are compliant in both vertical and rotational direction.  This means that the legs can push even though they rotate.  Brushless motors are perfect for this type of application because they are high-efficiency motors, they have no friction due to the brushes, and produce no sparks while in operation.

maxon designs and manufactures their complete line of both brush and brushless motors in-house.  They also provide gearheads, encoders, and other accessories for their motors, including a wide array of electronics.  The company’s EC flat brushless motors are available in power ratings from 12 to over 70 watts, and come standard with Hall sensors.  The motors are also available in a variety of operating voltages, as well as speeds and torques. maxon motors offer long life and quiet operation.

There are two phases to each leg’s operation: the ground phase and the aerial phase.  Like an insect, three legs are in each phase of operation at any particular time.  This provides static stability for the robot.  The gait is called an alternating tripod gait, and is the most stable operation for a six-legged machine.

The ground phase of the rotation has to move at a slower speed and requires a higher torque rating.  The aerial phase of the rotation needs to move at a faster speed, but requires lower torque.  This is because the legs are on the ground for only about 60 to 90 degrees of rotation, while they are in the air the other 270 to 300 degrees of rotation.

Further, friction is created while the C-leg is in its ground phase no matter what the terrain.  Since the X-RHex can travel over rocks, sand, dirt, grass, the floor of a building, etc., the time the leg spends in the ground phase versus the aerial phase is variable.  Note that not all gaits have to be tripod based, either. But, to be as flexible as possible, different algorithms must be created for each gait dependent upon where the robot is expected to travel.

For more information, contact:
maxon precision motors, inc.
101 Waldron Rd
Fall River, MA 02720                                                          
T: +1 508 677 0520
F: +1 508 677 0530
www.maxonmotorusa.com

Kod*Lab
University of Pennsylvania
http://kodlab.seas.upenn.edu/Main/HomePage

Tags:  maxon, maxon motor, Hexapedal Robot, Robot, Motion Control, Automation, Mars, Servo Motor, Brushless Motor, Brushless Servo Motor

Recorded Webinar: The Evolution of Ethernet in Motion and I/O Control

YouTube Video  57 minutes

In case you missed the May 13th Galil Motion Control Webinar -The Evolution of Ethernet in Motion and I/O Control, a recorded version can be viewed at the following link-

This webinar focuses on the evolution of Ethernet-based motion control and why Ethernet is the protocol of choice for industrial and automation applications.  The webinar discusses the differences of Ethernet in a distributed vs centralized architecture as well as the trade off in performance.  Topics include deterministic and non-deterministic Ethernet communication protocols and what applications they are best suited for.

 

Tags:  Webinar, Galil, Galil Motion Control, Electromate, Ethernet, Motion Control, Machine Control, Motor Control, I/O Control

 

 

 

The maxon X drives family of configurable products is growing

Like all motors in the DCX series, these brushed DC motors feature high power density and low vibration.  In addition to the technical highlights, the program’s appeal lies in the configuration options.  Motors, gearheads and encoders may be selected and ordered online.  After only 11 working days, even complex drive systems are ready to be shipped.  Detailed product data can be viewed online immediately, and 3D data for the configuration is available for downloading.  Discover more at dcx.maxonmotor.com

Maxon DCX Product Family

Maxon DCX Product Family

The center of the maxon motor is the unique ironless winding.  This motor concept has unique advantages, including low electromagnetic interference and a complete lack of magnetic cogging torque.  The efficiency is unrivaled by other motor systems.

The maxon X drives family is being expanded to include two additional motor sizes: 16 mm and 32 mm.  The new 16 mm DCX 16 S is available with precious metal and graphite brushes and can be combined with the new GPX 16 planetary gearhead in the customary modular system.  Combinations with ENX encoders round off the modular system for demanding control tasks.  The new DCX 32 L is also available with graphite brushes and can be combined with the GPX 32.  This 32 mm diameter DC motor is a powerhouse with excellent parameters that can easily hold up to the competition.  The high thermal resistance helps it achieve higher continuous power.

Three more versions are also being added to the GPX gearhead family.  The GPX 16 and GPX 32 gearheads are available with diameters matching those of the motors, in 1-stage and 2-stage versions.  The planetary gearheads have scaled gear stages.  That means the geometry has been optimized for the load in each stage.  With the compact design and the welded connections at the motors, the length may be kept to an absolute minimum.

The GP 16 A planetary gearhead, manufactured by maxon, has been part of the company’s product program for many years, with great success.  On the GPX 16, it was possible to install larger ball bearings.  This increases the maximum permissible radial load by several factors.  The maximum permitted input speed was also significantly increased to 14,000 rpm.

The GPX 32 planetary gearhead features higher input speeds of up to 7,000 rpm and higher continuous torques of up to 2.9 Nm. The previous values were 6,000 rpm and 2.25 Nm.

The 22 mm planetary gearhead is now also available as a low-backlash version, the GPX 22 LZ.  In total, there are now four different gearhead versions available: standard, ceramic, reduced noise level and reduced backlash.

EDITORIAL CONTACT:

Warren Osak
sales@electromate.com
Toll Free Phone:   877-737-8698
Toll Free Fax:       877-737-8699
www.electromate.com

Tags:  maxon, DCX, Electromate,  brush motor, dc brushed motor, dc motor, gear, gearhead, gearheads, motion control, motors, motors & motion control, electric motor, encoder


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