Posts Tagged 'Servo Systems'

Motion Control Technology Handbook

Published by Manufacturing Automation

Manufacturing AUTOMATION’s ‘Motion Control Technology Handbook’ is a digital magazine that focuses on Automation and Motion Control products and systems.  Posted on MA’s website as an interactive flip-style magazine, the Technology Handbook provides market information, technical product information, tutorial video’s, white papers as well as trends within the Motion Control Industry.

Motion Control Technology Handbook

 

This is a must-read for all to OEM machine builders, end users and system integrators.  Click on the link below to view the Handbook.

http://mfgautomation.techhandbook.dgtlpub.com/2013/2013-11-30/home.php

Tags:  Motion Control, Motor Control, Machine Control, Servo Systems, Stepper Systems

Asynchronous vs. Deterministic Communication and Types of Motion Controller Topologies

Asynchronous vs. Synchronous CommunicationA motion control system is a system that controls the position, velocity, force or pressure of some machine.  As an example, an electromechanical based motion control system consists of a motion controller (the brains of the system), a drive (which takes the low power command signal from the motion controller and converts it into high power current/voltage to the motor), a motor (which converts electrical energy to mechanical energy), a feedback device (which sends signals back to the motion controller to make adjustments until the system produces the desired result), and a mechanical system (including actuators, which physically produce the desired end result).

A motion controller is the primary intelligence, or brain, within a motion control system.  It is responsible for calculating and generating the output commands for a desired motion path or trajectory. Motion controllers vary in complexity; sophisticated motion controllers typically consist of a trajectory generator (path planner), interpolator, and control loop for servo motor control.

Types of Motion Control Systems
Open Loop System – A system that does not use feedback to verify the desired result, or output, has been reached.  Most step motor systems are operated open loop.

Closed Loop System – A system that uses feedback to verify the desired result, or output, has been reached. As an example, a feedback device such as an encoder is commonly used to provide position or velocity information to a motion controller.  A servo motor system requires the use of a feedback  device.

Types of Motion Controller Topologies
PLC based motion controllers typically utilize a digital output device, such as a counter module, that resides within the PLC system to generate command signals to a motor drive.  They are usually chosen when simple, low cost motion control is required but are typically limited to a few axes and have limited coordination capabilities.

PC based motion controllers typically consist of dedicated hardware run by a real-time operating system.  They use standard computer busses such as PCI, Ethernet, Serial, USB, and others for communication between the motion controller and host system.  PC based controllers generate a ±10V analog output voltage command for servo control and digital command signals, commonly referred to as step and direction, for stepper control.  PC based motion controllers typically are used when high axes count and/or tight coordination is required.  The drawbacks of this topology include complex cabling and potentially long wiring distances between the drive and motor.

A fieldbus based motion controller topology consists of a communication interface device and intelligent drive(s).  The communication interface device typically resides within a PLC or PC system and connects to a single or multiple intelligent drives.  The drives contain all the functionality of the motion controller and function as a complete single axis system.  Often the drives can be daisy chained to other intelligent drives on the same fieldbus.  The benefits include all digital communication, detailed diagnostics, reduced cabling, high axes count and short wiring distance between the drive and motor.  This topology has a higher cost especially at lower axes count and has limitations providing tight coordination for multiple axes.  Examples of this topology include Profibus, DeviceNet, RS-232/485, and others.

Asynchronous vs. Deterministic Topology
Asynchronous communication is transmission of data, generally without the use of an external clock signal, where data can be transmitted intermittently rather than in a steady stream.  Asynchronous literally means not synchronous, meaning, data is not transmitted at regular intervals, thus making possible variable bit rate, and that the transmitter and receiver clock generators do not have to be exactly synchronized all the time.

Deterministic communication is the transmission of data reaching its destination in a specific, predicable time.  Time critical data transfer must be guaranteed within short and precise configurable cycles, while less critical data can be transmitted in asynchronous time slots.  Data reaching its destination at guaranteed times are critical for motion control.

A deterministic bus based motion controller topology splits the motion controller functionality across a communication interface device and intelligent drive via a deterministic digital network.  The communication interface device typically resides within a PLC or PC system and contains the trajectory generator.  The intelligent drives typically contain the control loop and interpolator and can be daisy chained to other intelligent drives on the same network.  The digital network is deterministic with low jitter to allow for tight coordination in multi axes applications.  The benefits include all digital communication, detailed diagnostics, reduced cabling, high axes count, tight coordination, and short wiring distance between the drive and motor.  This topology has a higher cost especially at lower axes count.  Examples of this topology include EtherCAT, SERCOS,  Ethernet Powerlink, PROFINET IRT, SynqNet, CANopen, and others.

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EDITORIAL CONTACT:
Warren Osak
sales@electromate.com
Toll Free Phone:   877-737-8698
Toll Free Fax:       877-737-8699
www.electromate.com

EtherCAT FieldBus Network Primer

EtherCAT Field NetworkThis document describes the evolution of motion and control system architectures and what new benefits are realized today when using EtherCAT®, whether for a large number of axes or simple systems using just a few. OEMs have many choices available and naturally gravitate to a given architecture in order to speed development and reduce costs. Machine systems, and mainly motion control, are normalized to meet the requirements of the application.

Highlighted too is not only the rise and acceptance for network connected motion control applications but also why they are here to stay. In fact, the continued demand for servo solutions like those provided by EtherCAT-based systems will grow faster than most others and come at lowered system costs to implement…

Click on the link below to view the complete White Paper.

http://www.a-m-c.com/download/whitepaper/EtherCAT_Performance_Advantage.pdf

More information on the EtherCAT products available from Electromate can be found at the link below-

http://www.electromate.com/products/?keyword=ethercat

For more information, please contact:

EDITORIAL CONTACT:
Warren Osak
sales@electromate.com
Toll Free Phone:   877-737-8698
Toll Free Fax:       877-737-8699
www.electromate.com

Author:  Karl A. Meier,  Advanced Motion Controls
June 2013

ADVANCED Motion Controls® introduces the most configurable analog servo drives to date

Available immediately are the B060A400AC and B100A400AC analog brushless servo drives providing up to 21kW and 35kW respectively.  The B060A400AC is capable of outputting 60A peak and 30A continuous while the B100A400AC outputs 100A peak and 50A continuous. These servo drives can operate with both AC and DC supply voltages with an AC voltage range of 200-240VAC and a DC voltage range of 255-373 VDC.  The built-in shunt circuit alleviates regeneration issues to increase the maximum deceleration rate of large inertial loads. Modes of operation include: Current, Duty Cycle, Voltage, IR Comp, Encoder Velocity, Hall Velocity and Tachometer.

B060A400AC Servo Amplifier

B060A400AC Servo Amplifier

DIP Switch selectable settings allow fine-tuning to match motor and machine dynamics without having to change components on the board.  Included are 17 current loop integrator gain settings, 32 current loop proportional gain settings, 8 velocity loop integrator gain settings and 4 tachometer scaling settings.  In addition, selectable inhibit logic, fault logic and linear ramping make these drives compatible with more controllers.  With so many configuration options these are our most configurable analog servo drives ever.

These new servo drives are suited for a wide range of applications including: assembly/general factory automation, satellite ground station positioning, robotics, testers, metalworking machines, alternative energy control, simulators and more.

More information on the B060A400AC and B100A400AC analog brushless servo drives can be viewed at-
http://www.electromate.com/products/?keyword=A400AC&d=105686

A copy of this Press Release can be viewed at-
http://www.electromate.com/news/?c=pressreleases&press_id=10539

For more information, please contact:

EDITORIAL CONTACT:
Warren Osak
sales@electromate.com
Toll Free Phone:   877-737-8698
Toll Free Fax:       877-737-8699
www.electromate.com

Tags:  Servo Amplifier, Servo Drive, BLDC Drive, PWM Amplifier, AMC, Advanced Motion Controls, Electromate

Cures for Mechanical Resonance in Industrial Servo Systems

Author-  George Ellis, Danaher Motion.  Reprint

Mechanical resonance is a pervasive problem in servo systems.  Most problems of resonance are caused by the compliance of power transmission components.  Standard servo control laws are structured for rigidly coupled loads.  However, in practical machines some compliance is always present; this compliance often reduces stability margins, forcing servo gains down and reducing machine performance.

Mechanical resonance falls into two categories: low-frequency and high-frequency. High-frequency resonance causes instability at the natural frequency of the mechanical system, typically between 500 and 1200 Hz. Low-frequency resonance occurs at the first phase crossover, typically 200 to 400 Hz.  Low-frequency resonance occurs more often in general industrial machines.  This distinction, rarely made in the literature, is  crucial in determining the most effective means of correction.  This paper will present several methods for dealing with low-frequency resonance, all of which are compared with laboratory data.

Click on the link below to download this White Paper.

http://www.electromate.com/db_support/attachments/Cures%20for%20Mechanical%20Resonance%20In%20Servo%20Systems.pdf

For more information, please contact:

EDITORIAL CONTACT:

Warren Osak
sales@electromate.com
Toll Free Phone:   877-737-8698
Toll Free Fax:       877-737-8699
www.electromate.com

Reduce Manufacturing Costs by Cycle Time Effects

The key to reducing production costs is found in Cycle Time effects.  You may IAI Cycle Time Effectsbe able to further reduce costs if you look closely at the CT effects.

So what exactly are CT effects?

Click on the link below to read the case study from IntelligentActuator.com on how production efficiency was significantly improved.

http://www.intelligentactuator.com/pdf/CT-Effects_CJ0196-2A-UST-1-1112.pdf

More information on the factory automation products from IAI can be viewed at-

http://www.electromate.com/products/?partner=1086624533

For more information, please contact:

EDITORIAL CONTACT:

Warren Osak
sales@electromate.com
Toll Free Phone:   877-737-8698
Toll Free Fax:       877-737-8699
www.electromate.com

Motion Control Terminology Primer

Motion Control Terminology Primer

Motion Control Terminology Primer

What makes a bus based Motion Controller deterministic?   What are the three types of Step Motors?   What is the difference between an Absolute Encoder and a Resolver?

These questions (and many more) are quickly answered in a free User Friendly 2page ‘Motion Control Terminology’ Primer.

The Primer covers the following topics:

  • Motion Control
  • Motion Controllers
  • Drives and Amplifiers
  • Motors
  • Feedback Sensors
  • Mechanical Systems

Click on the link below to download the free ‘Motion Control Terminology’ Primer.

http://www.electromate.com/db_support/downloads/MotionControlTerminologyPrimerv2.pdf

EDITORIAL CONTACT:
Warren Osak
sales@electromate.com
Toll Free Phone:   877-737-8698
Toll Free Fax:       877-737-8699
www.electromate.com


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