Power Off Brake Backlash. What you need to know.

Author- Rocco Dragone, Deltran Product Specialist, division Thomson Industries

Power Off Brakes, sometimes referred to as Safety Brakes, Spring Set Brakes or Fail Safe Brakes, are widely used in the industry, usually on the back of motors, to hold a machine, pulley, Z axis, or robotic arm in position in case of a power failure.

There are many application and technical issues that arise when it comes to utilizing Power Off Brakes.  One of the most common issues has to do with backlash in the brake, or what is described as lash, free play, or lost motion.  Backlash is defined as how much or how many degrees (+and-) the shaft will rotate (lost motion) while the brake is holding (no power). This depends on the type of “hub” or “drive”….

Click on the link below to download this complete White Paper.

http://www.electromate.com/db_support/downloads/Power_Off_Brake_Backlashv2.pdf

Information on Electromate’s family of failsafe brakes can be found at-

http://www.electromate.com/products/?partner=1031080113

For more information, please contact:

EDITORIAL CONTACT:
Warren Osak
sales@electromate.com
Toll Free Phone:   877-737-8698
Toll Free Fax:       877-737-8699
www.electromate.com

Tags:  Electric Brake, Failsafe Brake, Brake Backlash, Power Off Brake, Power On Brake, Electromate

0 Responses to “Power Off Brake Backlash. What you need to know.”



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