Posts Tagged 'Brush Servo Motor'

Brush Servo Motor vs. Brushless Servo Motor: which is better for my application?

By Warren Osak, CEO of Electromate

A common misconception is that a brushless servo motor is always going to be a superior solution to a brush servo motor.  In many industrial automation applications, this assumption can be furthest from the truth.  A comparison of the benefits and drawbacks of brush and brushless servo motors is described in this White Paper. Read More

Featured Video: BRUSHED VS BRUSHLESS DC MOTOR SELECTION

What kind of motor is best for your application?  This 6min video helps you to decide whether a brushed motor or a brushless motor would work better for your needs.  Start your e-learning now with Dr. Urs Kafader from the maxon academy.

 

CLICK HERE to watch this 6minute video.

For more information, please contact:

EDITORIAL CONTACT:
Warren Osak
sales@electromate.com
Toll Free Phone:   877-737-8698
Toll Free Fax:       877-737-8699
www.electromate.com

Tags:  Brush motor, brush servo motor, brushless motor, BLDC motor, motor selection, Maxon, Electromate

High Efficiency Motors

Reprint of maxon motor USA October 14, 2014 white paper

To understand the concept of high efficiency motors, you must first know how to calculate efficiency and the losses associated with the motor components themselves.

The final measured efficiency of a motor is calculated based only on the elements of the particular application they’re used in.  For the motors themselves, without a load, manufacturers provide ratings based on standard formulas.  To understand high efficiency motors you only need to know what makes them different.

Cutaway of a maxon brush servo motor

Cutaway of a maxon brush servo motor

But first, let’s look at the basic concept used for explaining motor efficiency, which says that efficiency is the ratio between the shaft output power and the electrical input power.  Shaft output can be measured in horsepower or watts. We’ll use watts for the purposes of this article.  The formula most often used is the simple one mentioned above:

ηm = Pout / Pin

where

ηm = motor efficiency
Pout = shaft power out (Watts)
Pin = electric power to the motor (Watts)

Once you’ve used this formula and found your efficiency – and it’s not 100 percent – it’s time to consider the losses that occurred inside the motor.  Motor efficiency drops based on a number of known factors where power is lost as current through the motor is met with a variety of resistances.  These losses can include the wiring and its resistance, iron losses due to magnetic events, and thermal losses.

The electrical power that is lost in the primary rotor and in the secondary stator windings are called resistance losses (or copper losses, because they are based on the characteristics of the wire used including its diameter and length).  Both primary and secondary resistance losses vary with the load in proportion to the current squared. For example:

Pcl = R I2

where

Pcl = stator winding, copper loss (W)
R = resistance (Ω)
I = current (Amp)

Other losses include, iron losses, as mentioned above.  These losses are the result of the amount of magnetic energy dissipated when the motor’s magnetic field is applied to the stator core.  Other factors involved include mechanical losses, which involve the friction in the motor bearings and stray losses, which are basically any remaining losses that are left after the resistance, iron, and mechanical losses are calculated.

The largest culprit for stray losses are the result of harmonic energies that are generated when the motor operates under load.  The load affects the shaft power output, which is why it’s impossible to discuss in a general article such as this.  But basically, these losses are dissipated as currents in the windings, harmonic flux components in the iron parts, and leakage in the laminate core.

High Efficiency Motors

The maxon high efficiency motors get their name because they provide efficiencies in the 90 percentiles as opposed to the 50 to 60 percent range for most motors in their class.

The key to high-efficiency for maxon lies in the fact that they have no iron losses. maxon manufactures ironless core or coreless motors designed to the needs of their customers.  This means that the losses associated with the iron components have been eliminated.  By designing coreless and ironless core motors, maxon also eliminated the largest concentration of stray losses associated with motors, which are losses associated with leakage in the laminate core.

maxon incorporates the use of permanent magnets in their motors.  The ironless core brush motors have a permanent magnet, then a rotating winding, and then the housing, which closes the magnetic path.  With this configuration, there is no electricity going through the core of the motor (through the iron parts) to create a magnetic resonance.

The benefits of the ironless winding provides very specific advantages, which include: there is no magnetic detent and there are minimal electromagnetic interferences.  Part of the efficiency, though, is dictated by the type of magnet used in the design.  For example, the stronger magnets, such as NdFe will offer higher efficiencies.  Add to this, the fact that maxon includes graphite brushes and ball bearings in their brushed motors, customers gain long service life as well as high efficiency.

Click on the link below to view the Maxon Motor Product Family.

http://www.electromate.com/products/?partner=1072297493

EDITORIAL CONTACT:
Warren Osak
sales@electromate.com
Toll Free Phone:   877-737-8698
Toll Free Fax:       877-737-8699
www.electromate.com

 

Tags:  high efficiency motor, servo motor, BLDC motor, maxon, maxon motor, Electromate, brush servo motor

Machine Optimization through DC Motor Selection

Maxon's Industrial Brush Servo Motors

Maxon’s Industrial Brush Servo Motors

This new White Paper from maxon precision motors, Inc. looks at the primary differences between DC brushed and brushless motors, what they can do, where they fit best, and how to decide which to use in your application.  DC motors are being used in more and more industrial applications because of their flexibility and long life.  Therefore, DC motor selection is often one of the most important steps in providing motion control of a medical machine, whether for prosthetics, medical tools, robotics, or medical training aids.

Click on the link below to download this new White Paper-

http://insidepenton.com/machinedesign/nl/Maxon-Machine-Optimization.pdf

More information on the Servo Motor Product Line from maxon precision motors can be viewed at

http://www.electromate.com/products/?partner=1072297493

For more information, please contact:

EDITORIAL CONTACT:

Warren Osak
sales@electromate.com
Toll Free Phone:   877-737-8698
Toll Free Fax:       877-737-8699
www.electromate.com

DC Brush Servo Motor Features Hundreds Of Variations

With fast response, accurate control and high torque-to-inertia ratios, you can count on the TORQUEMASTER 2100 Series of brush servo motors to provide smooth operation throughout a full speed range.  The 2100 Series delivers smooth and superior low speed performance, and maximum power ratings with low thermal resistance for high speed performance.  In addition, with maximum torque in a smaller package, you can count on better pricing for a better overall value.

Torque Systems 2100 Series DC Brush Servo Motor

Torque Systems 2100 Series DC Brush Servo Motor

Best of all, the 2100 Series features hundreds of variations to suit almost every application.  Features include:

  • Standard NEMA 23 shaft & motor mount
  • Optional round flange mounting (as shown)
  • High torque-to-inertia ratio
  • Low thermal resistance
  • Low current consumption
  • 12″ lead wire termination
  • Rugged industrial construction
  • Superior low speed performance
  • 8 different motor windings available
  • Integral tachometer, encoder, brake and/or gearbox options
  • Continuous torque to 3.3 lb-in; no load speeds up to 6500 RPM
  • CE Compliant

More information on the 2100 Series can be viewed at-
http://www.electromate.com/products/series.php?&series_id=100361

For more information, please contact:

EDITORIAL CONTACT:
Warren Osak
sales@electromate.com
Toll Free Phone:   877-737-8698
Toll Free Fax:       877-737-8699
www.electromate.com


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