Posts Tagged 'Distributed Control'

Ethernet or EtherCAT for Motion Control Webinar: Choosing the Right Network for Your Applications

JANUARY 26, 2016  |  11:00 AM ET

With the increasing presence of EtherCAT in the motion control industry, choosing between EtherCAT and Ethernet is becoming an increasingly important question. This presentation will cover the technical differences between both methods and provide advice on how to choose between them based on application requirements.  Strengths and weakness of both Ethernet and EtherCAT will be discussed including development time, ease of use, cost, and complexity.

Additionally, Galil’s DMC-500×0 EtherCAT Master and DMC-40×0 Ethernet controller will be reviewed with regards to the capabilities and advantages they can offer.  This presentation is geared towards system developers looking to understand the differences, costs, and capabilities of both Ethernet and EtherCAT.

Can’t make the live webinar?  Register today and we will send you a recorded copy after the live presentation.

Meet the Speaker:
 Matt Klint pic Matt Klint
Applications Engineer
Galil Motion Control
Matt Klint joined Galil in 2013 as an Applications Engineer. Before coming to Galil, he worked as a development engineer in the Physics department at UC Davis where he was involved in developing hardware and software solutions for experiments in Condensed Matter and Astrophysics. Matt has brought this expertise to Galil and has worked with numerous research institutions on motion control and data collection projects. At Galil, he has worked closely with other Applications Engineers and R&D on development of Galil’s EtherCAT compatible controllers. Matt holds a BS in Physics from the University of California at Davis.

 

Evolution of Ethernet in Control Systems. A New White Paper from Galil

Authors:  Robin Riley, Ann Keffer, Wayne Baron  Galil Motion Control

Ethernet was developed in the 1970’s and was started being used commercially in the 1980’s.   By the end of the 1980’s it was the dominant network technology.  It was initially used to connect computer systems and peripherals in a Local Area Network (LAN) and quickly evolved to be the protocol used for Wide Area Networks (WAN).  Then came the world-wide web and the incorporation of the internet into every aspect of communication.

In the mid to late 1990’s, Ethernet’s popularity spread to control systems.  The engineering team here at Galil Motion Control determined Ethernet was a viable protocol in 1999 and introduced its first Ethernet Motion Controller.  Even today, Ethernet is the most popular method of network communication in control systems.

Before Ethernet

Before Ethernet was considered viable for control systems, several other communication protocols were popular.

  • Bus-based communication was used when the controller lived within the computer. This solution was often cumbersome because the computer had to be large enough to house the motion controller, and the computer had to be and very close to the often noisy, dirty machine.
  • Daisy-Chain serial communication allows for distributed systems. The network was a series of controllers with a master. The master transmitted packets to the first device. The first device read the packet address, kept the packet if appropriate, or sent it on if it was addressed to another controller. This solution was very slow at the typical 9600 baud rate.
  • RS-485 multi-drop allowed data to be received by multiple motion controllers at the same time, but the speed was also slow, and the packet size was small.
  • Various proprietary serial communication networks became popular. These protocols were useful when data was short, repetitive and simple. Some of them are still used in some control systems today.
  • Proprietary serial communication protocols such as CANOpen, Profibus, MultiNet and DeviceNet were developed because motion control systems needed more intelligence than bus-based and primitive serial networks could provide. The protocols needed to be able to take advantage of increasingly capable motion system hardware. Because these protocols were proprietary and part of a ‘turn-key’ solution, they were also expensive and created a barrier to migration. Customers were locked into a single hardware and software vendor and support for these solutions had to come straight from the supplier.

By the 1990’s, Ethernet provided an alternative to proprietary bus communication because it was scalable, affordable, and flexible.  Ethernet became ubiquitous…

Click on the link below to download the entire White Paper.

http://www.electromate.com/db_support/downloads/EvolutionofEthernetinControlSystemsWhitePaper.pdf

To view a 57 minute pre-recorded webinar on this topic, click on the link below-

 

Click on the link below for information on Galil’s Motion Controller Family-

Galil’s Motion Controller Family

For more information, please contact:

EDITORIAL CONTACT:
Warren Osak
sales@electromate.com
Toll Free Phone:   877-737-8698
Toll Free Fax:       877-737-8699
www.electromate.com

 

Tags:  Ethernet, Motion Control, Automation, CANOpen, Profibus, MultiNet, DeviceNet, Deterministic Networks, Non-Deterministic Networks, Electromate, Distributed Control, UDP/IP,  Transmission Control Protocol (TCP/IP), EtherCAT, Ethernet/IP, ASCII

 

EtherCAT FieldBus Network Primer

EtherCAT Field NetworkThis document describes the evolution of motion and control system architectures and what new benefits are realized today when using EtherCAT®, whether for a large number of axes or simple systems using just a few. OEMs have many choices available and naturally gravitate to a given architecture in order to speed development and reduce costs. Machine systems, and mainly motion control, are normalized to meet the requirements of the application.

Highlighted too is not only the rise and acceptance for network connected motion control applications but also why they are here to stay. In fact, the continued demand for servo solutions like those provided by EtherCAT-based systems will grow faster than most others and come at lowered system costs to implement…

Click on the link below to view the complete White Paper.

http://www.a-m-c.com/download/whitepaper/EtherCAT_Performance_Advantage.pdf

More information on the EtherCAT products available from Electromate can be found at the link below-

http://www.electromate.com/products/?keyword=ethercat

For more information, please contact:

EDITORIAL CONTACT:
Warren Osak
sales@electromate.com
Toll Free Phone:   877-737-8698
Toll Free Fax:       877-737-8699
www.electromate.com

Author:  Karl A. Meier,  Advanced Motion Controls
June 2013


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