Posts Tagged 'EtherNet'

Ethernet or EtherCAT for Motion Control Webinar: Choosing the Right Network for Your Applications

JANUARY 26, 2016  |  11:00 AM ET

With the increasing presence of EtherCAT in the motion control industry, choosing between EtherCAT and Ethernet is becoming an increasingly important question. This presentation will cover the technical differences between both methods and provide advice on how to choose between them based on application requirements.  Strengths and weakness of both Ethernet and EtherCAT will be discussed including development time, ease of use, cost, and complexity.

Additionally, Galil’s DMC-500×0 EtherCAT Master and DMC-40×0 Ethernet controller will be reviewed with regards to the capabilities and advantages they can offer.  This presentation is geared towards system developers looking to understand the differences, costs, and capabilities of both Ethernet and EtherCAT.

Can’t make the live webinar?  Register today and we will send you a recorded copy after the live presentation.

Meet the Speaker:
 Matt Klint pic Matt Klint
Applications Engineer
Galil Motion Control
Matt Klint joined Galil in 2013 as an Applications Engineer. Before coming to Galil, he worked as a development engineer in the Physics department at UC Davis where he was involved in developing hardware and software solutions for experiments in Condensed Matter and Astrophysics. Matt has brought this expertise to Galil and has worked with numerous research institutions on motion control and data collection projects. At Galil, he has worked closely with other Applications Engineers and R&D on development of Galil’s EtherCAT compatible controllers. Matt holds a BS in Physics from the University of California at Davis.

 

Evolution of Ethernet in Control Systems. A New White Paper from Galil

Authors:  Robin Riley, Ann Keffer, Wayne Baron  Galil Motion Control

Ethernet was developed in the 1970’s and was started being used commercially in the 1980’s.   By the end of the 1980’s it was the dominant network technology.  It was initially used to connect computer systems and peripherals in a Local Area Network (LAN) and quickly evolved to be the protocol used for Wide Area Networks (WAN).  Then came the world-wide web and the incorporation of the internet into every aspect of communication.

In the mid to late 1990’s, Ethernet’s popularity spread to control systems.  The engineering team here at Galil Motion Control determined Ethernet was a viable protocol in 1999 and introduced its first Ethernet Motion Controller.  Even today, Ethernet is the most popular method of network communication in control systems.

Before Ethernet

Before Ethernet was considered viable for control systems, several other communication protocols were popular.

  • Bus-based communication was used when the controller lived within the computer. This solution was often cumbersome because the computer had to be large enough to house the motion controller, and the computer had to be and very close to the often noisy, dirty machine.
  • Daisy-Chain serial communication allows for distributed systems. The network was a series of controllers with a master. The master transmitted packets to the first device. The first device read the packet address, kept the packet if appropriate, or sent it on if it was addressed to another controller. This solution was very slow at the typical 9600 baud rate.
  • RS-485 multi-drop allowed data to be received by multiple motion controllers at the same time, but the speed was also slow, and the packet size was small.
  • Various proprietary serial communication networks became popular. These protocols were useful when data was short, repetitive and simple. Some of them are still used in some control systems today.
  • Proprietary serial communication protocols such as CANOpen, Profibus, MultiNet and DeviceNet were developed because motion control systems needed more intelligence than bus-based and primitive serial networks could provide. The protocols needed to be able to take advantage of increasingly capable motion system hardware. Because these protocols were proprietary and part of a ‘turn-key’ solution, they were also expensive and created a barrier to migration. Customers were locked into a single hardware and software vendor and support for these solutions had to come straight from the supplier.

By the 1990’s, Ethernet provided an alternative to proprietary bus communication because it was scalable, affordable, and flexible.  Ethernet became ubiquitous…

Click on the link below to download the entire White Paper.

http://www.electromate.com/db_support/downloads/EvolutionofEthernetinControlSystemsWhitePaper.pdf

To view a 57 minute pre-recorded webinar on this topic, click on the link below-

 

Click on the link below for information on Galil’s Motion Controller Family-

Galil’s Motion Controller Family

For more information, please contact:

EDITORIAL CONTACT:
Warren Osak
sales@electromate.com
Toll Free Phone:   877-737-8698
Toll Free Fax:       877-737-8699
www.electromate.com

 

Tags:  Ethernet, Motion Control, Automation, CANOpen, Profibus, MultiNet, DeviceNet, Deterministic Networks, Non-Deterministic Networks, Electromate, Distributed Control, UDP/IP,  Transmission Control Protocol (TCP/IP), EtherCAT, Ethernet/IP, ASCII

 

Recorded Webinar: The Evolution of Ethernet in Motion and I/O Control

YouTube Video  57 minutes

In case you missed the May 13th Galil Motion Control Webinar -The Evolution of Ethernet in Motion and I/O Control, a recorded version can be viewed at the following link-

This webinar focuses on the evolution of Ethernet-based motion control and why Ethernet is the protocol of choice for industrial and automation applications.  The webinar discusses the differences of Ethernet in a distributed vs centralized architecture as well as the trade off in performance.  Topics include deterministic and non-deterministic Ethernet communication protocols and what applications they are best suited for.

 

Tags:  Webinar, Galil, Galil Motion Control, Electromate, Ethernet, Motion Control, Machine Control, Motor Control, I/O Control

 

 

 

Live Webinar on May 13: The Evolution of Ethernet in Motion Control

Ethernet in Motion Control to More than Triple by 2016

World Market for Industrial Communication Technologies in Motor Control Equipment

World Market for Industrial Communication Technologies in Motor Control Equipment

Reprint of March 13, 2013 Automation.com Article

March 13, 2013 – The use of Ethernet with motor drives and motion controllers will more than triple to 2016 from 1.8 million new connected nodes in 2011. According to IMS Research, the compound annual growth rate (CAGR) for new motor control Ethernet nodes is projected to be the highest across the whole industrial space at nearly 30%.

IHS analyst, Tom Moore, commented “Ethernet, particularly certain industrial variants, is very well suited to drive and motion control applications. The growing number of Ethernet protocols, which are high-speed, deterministic, and low jitter, mean its application has never been easier. Some of the most suited protocols are forecast annual growth rates exceeding 30% to 2016”.

As Figure 1 shows, new Ethernet nodes are forecast to account for over 20% of the total new networked motor control products in 2016. This is a large increase from the estimated 12% in 2011, when fieldbus protocols dominated new node connections. Ethernet is quickly gaining ground in a market that is well known for being reserved and slow to adopt new technology.

Moore continued, “Part of the transition to Ethernet is due to the protocols available, such as PROFINET, Ethernet/IP, POWERLINK and EtherCAT, which are all very well suited to motor control applications. In particular, EtherCAT is well known for very high speed data transmission and low response times. Its adoption is forecast to grow very strongly to 2016, especially as its member count continues to increase.”

Networking, however, isn’t just about the technology or protocols on offer; it is about the equipment itself. Nodes, the connections to the higher network, are set to increase and part of this is being driven by an increasing number of ports per device. This has an added affect to the adoption growth of networking technologies. “The increase in node count has come about for several reasons,” indicated Moore. “More and more products are being released with the ability to daisy-chain, requiring at least 2 ports.”

Ethernet is certainly making headway in the industrial space and its projected adoption growth is set to outstrip that of fieldbus technologies in almost all applications. “It is forecast that in 10 to 15 years Ethernet will have replaced fieldbus as the mainstream networking technology for motor control products.” says Moore, “This can only be good for the unification and simplification of networking solutions; driving down costs and increasing up-time”.

“The World Market for Industrial Ethernet and Fieldbus Technologies – 2013 Edition” is now available. This includes extensive analysis of industrial Ethernet and fieldbus technologies used in motor control, process and control and discrete control.

Low-Cost Stepper Drive for DMC-30000 1-Axis Ethernet Motion Controller

Galil is announcing the DMC-30016 1-axis motion controller packaged with a 1.4A/phase Stepper Drive in a single, compact unit. It joins the growing family of drive options for the DMC-30000 Pocket Motion Controller Series which includes the previously released DMC-30012 800W Brushless Sine Drive and DMC-30017 6A/phase Microstepping Drive.

Galil DMC-30016 Motion Controller with Stepper Drive

Galil DMC-30016 Motion Controller with Stepper Drive

The new DMC-30016 controller contains a 1.4A/phase, 30V stepper drive in a compact 4.0” x 5.0” x 1.5” package. It drives a two-phase bipolar stepper motor in full-step, half-step, ¼ step or 1/16 step. The DMC-30016 is user configurable from 0.5A to 1.4A per phase in 10mA increments at 12-30VDC. No external heatsink is required.

The DMC-30016 controller/stepper drive is cost-effective at $645 U.S. in single quantity and $415 in quantities of 100.

More information on the DMC-30016 from Galil Motion Control can be viewed at-

DMC-30016 Product Information

For more information, please contact:

EDITORIAL CONTACT:

Warren Osak
sales@electromate.com
Toll Free Phone:   877-737-8698
Toll Free Fax:       877-737-8699
www.electromate.com

Introducing Our Latest Video: ST Stepper Drives with Ethernet

Learn more about our latest product release through this informative video which offers a detailed introduction to the drive and walks you through wiring and setting one up. We’ve made it easy to work with our latest Ethernet technology and we’re very excited to add one more informative video to our growing collection.

Find the current videos offered at any time by visiting the Videos page under the Support tab on our website. Or jump on out to it right here.

For more information on the ST Series Stepper Drives with Ethernet from Applied Motion products, click on the link below:
http://www.electromate.com/products/series.php?&series_id=101719

EDITORIAL CONTACT:
Warren Osak       
sales@electromate.com
Toll Free Phone:   877-737-8698  
Toll Free Fax:       877-737-8699
www.electromate.com

 


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